Humanities

Courses

English

ENG 099     Basic English
Credit Hours: 3
Intensive approach to the basics of academic reading and writing with emphasis on grammar, editing, and the coherent and effective short essay. Intended for students who need extra preparation before being admitted to ENG 111. Placement according to ACT or SAT scores and advisement. (Although credit is given for this course, it does not fulfill a general education requirement in writing and is not counted as part of the minimum degree requirements for a Quincy University degree.)

ENG 101-102  English as a Second Language, I and II
Credit Hours: 1-6
Essentials of English grammar, sentence structure, oral and written composition and reading for the student whose native language is not English. On demand only. These courses do not apply toward a degree. A/F scale.

ENG 111     Composition
Credit Hours: 3
Introduction to interdisciplinary academic writing, with emphasis on critical thinking and reading, inquiry, primary research, and writing as a process. [C1 900]

ENG 112     Composition and Texts
Credit Hours: 3
A continuation of the inquiry-based interdisciplinary approach of ENG 111 with emphasis on textual analysis, secondary research, and writing as a process. [C1 901R]

ENG 210     British Masters I
Credit Hours: 3
Major writers from Old and Middle English periods through the 18th century. Prerequisite: completion of ENG 112. [H3 912]

ENG 211     British Masters II
Credit Hours: 3
Major writers of the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern periods. Prerequisite: completion of ENG 112. [H3 913]

ENG 220     Major American Writers
Credit Hours: 3
Major American writers from colonial times to the present. Prerequisite: completion of ENG 112. [H3 914]

ENG 225    Major Ethnic and Minority Voices in American Literature
Credit Hours: 3
A study of the major ethnic and minority voices in American literature. Prerequisite: ENG 112.

ENG 230     World Literature I
Credit Hours: 3
Poetry, drama, and fiction from ancient times to the 17th century. Prerequisite: completion of ENG 112. [H3 906]

ENG 231     World Literature II
Credit Hours: 3
Poetry, drama, and fiction from the 17th century to the present. Prerequisite: completion of ENG 112. [H3 907]

ENG 250     Introduction to Language
Credit Hours: 3
This course is for learning about language as it is conceived and described in contemporary linguistics. New research and thinking in this field enter into the various discussions of language and learning in the national media and elsewhere in our culture, and are especially interesting and important to those who plan to teach in any discipline where language – its acquisition, its structure, its psychology, its philosophy, its social context – is a core concern. This is a required course for those seeking 6-12 certification in English. Students seeking this certification will learn basic linguistic concepts and their applications to teaching. This course does not fulfill the general education requirement in literature.

ENG 260     Fiction [H3 901]    Credit Hours: 3
ENG 261     Poetry [H3 903]    Credit Hours: 3
ENG 262     Drama [H3 902]    Credit Hours: 3
Three separate courses, each an introduction to reading and understanding a particular genre of literature. (Drama is not an acting course.) Prerequisite: completion of ENG 112.

ENG 263     Comedy In Literature
Credit Hours: 3
Comic drama from Aristophanes to Pinter and classic comic films; comic satire from Juvenal to Barthelme, including the American humorist tradition. Prerequisite: completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENG 112. [H3 902]

ENG 270-9  Special Topics In Literature
Credit Hours: 1-3
Concentrated courses on various topics depending upon demand and staff. Prerequisite: completion of ENG 112.

ENG 300     Advanced Writing
Credit Hours: 3
Extensive practice in writing strategies, including argument, with emphasis on stylistic improvement. This course does not satisfy the general education requirement in literature. Prerequisites: completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature and junior standing.

ENG 306     Creative Writing: Memoir
Credit Hours: 3
Study and exploration of the art of writing memoir. Prerequisites: completion of general education requirements in composition and literature and at least junior standing. (This course does not satisfy a literature requirement.)

ENG 307     Creative Writing: Fiction
Credit Hours: 3
Study and exploration of the art of writing fiction. Prerequisites: completion of general education requirements in composition and literature and at least junior standing. (This course does not satisfy a literature requirement.)

ENG 308     Creative Writing: Poetry
Credit Hours: 3
Study and exploration of the art of writing poetry. Prerequisites: completion of general education requirements in composition and literature and at least junior standing. (This course does not satisfy a literature requirement.)

ENG 315     Literature of Greece, Rome, and Israel
Credit Hours: 3
Readings in three major literatures that have shaped the world. Students will read Homer and the Greek dramatists, a selection of major Roman authors, and several books of the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisites: completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature.

ENG 324     American Poetry
Credit Hours: 3
A study of major American poets from the colonial period to the present. Prerequisites: completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature and Junior standing.

ENG 330     Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales in Middle English
Credit Hours: 3
Intensive study of Chaucer’s language and his most famous and popular work. Pre-requisite: completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature.

ENG 340     The Renaissance
Credit Hours: 3
Major writers, exclusive of Shakespeare. Prerequisite: completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature.

ENG 345     Shakespeare
Credit Hours: 3
Shakespeare’s plays are not just to be read, they’re also to be performed. In addition to reading the plays, the class will enjoy Shakespeare on stage, if possible, and on film whenever interesting film is available. In this class students will see how Shakespeare manages to straddle high culture and popular culture, somehow pleasing both literary sophisticates and mass audiences. Students should expect to learn about Shakespeare and about what happens when Shakespeare encounters film. Prerequisite: completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature.

ENG 350     The Restoration and the 18th Century
Credit Hours: 3
British writers from the period 1660-1798. Prerequisite: Completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature.

ENG 355     Romantic Literature
Credit Hours: 3
A study of the early 19th century writers called romantic – those writers concerned with nature, the imagination, the local, the exotic, and the Gothic. Some attention to the debates about Romanticism and rationalism, revolution and tradition. Readings in such poets as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, Shelley, and selected women poets, and to such novelists and essayists as Wollstonecraft, Dorothy Wordsworth, Mary Shelley, and Austen. Prerequisites: completion of general education requirements in composition and literature.

ENG 360     Victorian Literature
Credit Hours: 3
British writers from the late 19th century. A survey of the literature and the social context of a period of revolutionary changes in science, economics, religion, and culture in England between 1830 and 1900. The course will involve readings in the poetry, novels, and prose of such writers as Tennyson, the Brownings, Dickens, George Eliot, Arnold, Hardy, Ruskin, and Emily Bronte. Prerequisites: completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature.

ENG 365     Modern British Writers
Credit Hours: 3
Writers of the 20th century. Prerequisite: completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature.

ENG 368     The Beat Movement in American Literature and Culture
Credit Hours: 3
Major works of Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and William Burroughs and their influence on subsequent writers and on American culture in general. Prerequisites: completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature.

ENG 370-9  Special Topics
Credit Hours: 1-3
Concentrated courses on various topics depending upon demand and staff. Prerequisite: completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature.

ENG 380     Literary Criticism
Credit Hours: 3
Readings in the theory and evolution of literature and other arts. Prerequisite: completion of general education requirements in composition and literature and at least junior standing.

ENG 382     Business Communication
Credit Hours: 3
This course will provide the opportunity for students to learn the skills and strategies necessary to become effective business communicators. This course counts toward a minor in writing but does not fulfill the general education requirement in literature or count toward the major in English. Prerequisites: ENG 111 and 112. (Same as COM 382)

ENG 385     Literature by Women
Credit Hours: 3
A study of how women writers from different historical periods use poems, stories, essays, and plays to address gender issues in the private and public world. The course looks at how literature both presents and critiques culture and its construction of gender, as well as how it offers new visions and choices for women and men. Readings include such writers as Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Virginia Woolf, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and Maxine Hong Kingston. Prerequisites: completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature.

ENG 390    Literature of the Vietnam War
Credit Hours: 3
This course examines the impact of the Vietnam War on American literature and culture from the 1960s up through today. Readings will include literature from a variety of genres (letters, song lyrics, poetry, fiction, memoir, and oral history). It will also include literature from a variety of perspectives (American, Vietnamese, British, male, female and minorities).

ENG 400     Methods of Teaching English and Language Arts
Credit Hours: 3
Designed to prepare the prospective secondary teacher of English and language arts. This course does not count toward the English major or minor or fulfill the general education requirement in literature. Prerequisite: acceptance into Teacher Education Program.

ENG 430    Major Writer(s) [corr.]
Credit Hours: 3
Intensive study of a major writer or writers. Prerequisite: Completion of a 300-level literature course.

ENG 470-9  Special Topics
Credit Hours: 1-3
Concentrated courses on various topics depending upon demand and staff. Prerequisite: completion of the general education requirements in composition and literature.

ENG 480     Practicum
Credit Hours: 1-6
Assignments involving practical applications of knowledge and skills the English curriculum develops. Students will be placed in appropriate settings. Approximately 50 hours of practicum is required per credit hour. This course counts toward a minor in writing and a minor in English but does not count toward an English major. English majors who complete a practicum will graduate with more than 124 credits.

ENG 485     Internship
Credit Hours: 3-12
An assignment in a setting appropriate to the student’s career goals. Approximately 50 hours of involvement is required per credit hour. This course counts toward a minor in writing and a minor in English but does not count toward an English major. English majors who complete an internship will graduate with more than 124 credits.

ENG 497     Seminar in English
Credit Hours: 3
Concentration upon a particular author, a particular literary movement, or a particular topic in the field of English. Required of senior English majors.


History

100 Level:  Survey Courses

HIS 101     World History I: Ancient to Early Modern
Credit Hours: 3
Ancient empires of East and West. Cultural, economic, and political developments in all major portions of the world through the 16th century. [S2 912N]

HIS 102     World History II: Modern to Contemporary
Credit Hours: 3
The world, East and West, and its cultural, social, and political developments from the 17th century to the present. (HIS 101 World History I is not a prerequisite for HIS 102 World History II.) [S2 913N]

HIS 111     United States History I: to 1877
Credit Hours: 3
The age of exploration and discovery, colonial civilizations, and the emergence of a new nation. The expansion of national territory and sectionalism through the Civil War and Reconstruction. [S2 900]

HIS 112     United States History II: Since 1877
Credit Hours: 3
The U.S. as an emergent world power and the major political, economic, and social forces in the domestic experience to the present. [S2 901]

200 Level:  General Interest Courses

HIS 208  The History of Women in the United States
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the contributions that women have made in American history from the 1600s to the present. The course will analyze the role that women of different ethnicity, race, and religion played in shaping the United States and how the legal and social status of women has changed over the centuries.

HIS 220  History of American Popular Culture
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the popular culture of the United States from the colonial period through the present. Popular Culture is an important reflection of the larger social, political and economic changes occurring in our nation.

HIS 225  African American History
Credit Hours: 3
This course will provide the student with a comprehensive survey of the role that African-Americans have played in shaping America as we know it today. Starting in Africa, moving through the arrival of the slave ships in the early 1600s, the Colonial period, the Revolutionary and Civil War periods, and into the last half of the twentieth century, African-American history will chronicle the sweep of events that have brought African-Americans and their struggle for social and economic equality to the forefront of American life. (formerly HIS 353)

HIS 230  The United States in the 20th Century
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores changes in the United States taking a topical approach to the major issues and problems faced during the 20th century. The course will focus on how the United States emerged as a world power and will examine American state and society in the 20th century.

HIS 235  Roman Archeology On-Site
Credit Hours: 3
This is an introductory course exploring the archeological sites and ancient monuments of Rome. The course will begin with the evidence for the earliest settlement in Rome and continue through the development of the Republic, the empire and the transition to early Christian Rome. The course will focus on placing the archeological and architectural evidence in its topographical context. Taught in Rome.

HIS 270-9  Special Topics
Credit Hours: 3
Special topics in history depending upon demand and staff.

300 Level:  Period, Area, and Issue Courses

HIS 310      Ancient Greece and Rome
Credit Hours: 3
This class will survey the ancient European cultures of Greece and Rome. It will focus upon the social, economic, literary and artistic themes that shaped the two cultures and also upon the legacy they left to Western civilization.

HIS 311     Modern Britain 1689-Present
Credit Hours: 3
This course covers the period of the Glorious Revolution, the evolution of Britain as a world economic and political power in the 18th and 19th Centuries and the decline of Britain as a global power in the 20th Century.

HIS 312     Modern Germany 1871-Present
Credit Hours: 3
Creation of the Second Reich, Weimar, the rise and fall of Hitler and Nazi Germany, divided Germany in the Cold War and its reunification. The course will also focus on the role of Germany in world politics throughout this era.

HIS 313    French Revolution and Napoleonic Era
Credit Hours: 3
Explores the origins and course of the French Revolution, the effects of the Napoleonic era and the impacts of this period on European history.

HIS 315     Modern Russia
Credit Hours: 3
This course covers the creation of Imperial Russia under Peter the Great to its collapse, the rise and fall of Soviet Russia, and the post Soviet era.

HIS 316    Modern European History Colloquium (1848 to present)
Credit Hours: 3
Selected themes from Modern European history including ideologies (liberalism, nationalism, socialism, fascism), wars (causes and consequences of imperial conflicts, and World Wars I and II), intellectual movements (in sociology, psychology, science, and philosophy), and the evolution of industrial capitalism and industrial society.

HIS 320    Modern Ireland
Credit Hours: 3
This course surveys modern Irish history from 1700 to the present. It will focus on the development of Irish nationalism as a response to British imperialism, as well as the resistance to nationalism among different groups.  Important themes include colonialism, famine, revolution, emigration, and continuing sectarian tensions.

HIS 322     Women and Gender in History
Credit Hours: 3
This course deals thematically with the roles, significance and evolving perceptions of women (and gender) in the West from the ancient, medieval and modern eras. A second emphasis will investigate the concept of women’s history within the field of history itself.

HIS 326     Hitler, Nazi Germany, and the Holocaust
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores one of the most horrific eras in the twentieth century, if not the entire history of humanity. Political, social, economic, cultural, and historical dimensions will be examined not only in Germany, but also in Europe, to understand the origins, actions and consequences of Hitler and Nazi Germany. This course will also attempt to comprehend the incomprehensible – the genocidal extermination of the Jews – through investigating the perpetrators, the bystanders, the victims, the survivors and the historians.

HIS 336     Modern China and Japan
Credit Hours: 3
This course focuses on the emergence of China and Japan in the 19th Century and their development as global powers in the 20th Century. [S2 908N]

HIS 343     Latin America
Credit Hours: 3
Examines selected themes from Latin American history from pre-Columbian societies to the present, including the great American empires, the Spanish conquest, colonial politics and society, independence, the formation of modern states, and contemporary history. [S2 910N]

HIS 350    World Geography
Credit Hours: 3
This course fulfills the requirements for history students working toward a social studies education certificate. It will familiarize students with the pivotal social, political and economic events in the history of Illinois from prehistory down to the present day. This course will also allow students to develop an  understanding of the character of various regions throughout the world as influenced by environmental, historical, and cultural forces. Emphasis will be given to thinking geographically in the study of man/land relationships and place formation.

HIS 355    History of Ideas in America
Credit Hours: 3
Designed to introduce students to the major contours in intellectual history from the time of the Puritans to the present. In this class, the students should develop a clear understanding of how ideas have shaped the course of American history.

HIS 356     U.S. Foreign Relations
Credit Hours: 3
Examines central themes, events, and personalities in U.S. relations with the world, including economics, racism, strategic interests, nationalism, and politics.

HIS 358     Religion in American History
Credit Hours: 3
What has been the role of religion in America? Taking a thematic and chronological approach, this course seeks to answer this question by exploring the way religion has shaped the people, cultures, and institutions in America from its pre-Columbian roots to the 21st century.

HIS 359     Immigration to the United States
Credit Hours: 3
This course surveys American immigration history with a special focus on ethnic and race relations. It emphasizes several critical issues such as ethnic and racial contact and conflict, language maintenance, immigration law, the “laws” of immigration, multiculturalism, nativism, and religion.

HIS 360     Revolution and Nation Making
Credit Hours: 3
Follows the path of American colonial society as it matured prior to the break with Britain. It will trace the causes of the American revolution and the effect of war on society including the social, economic and political changes it brought about. Finally, it will focus upon the creation of the Constitution and the Early Republic through the War of 1812.

HIS 361     Colonial America
Credit Hours: 3
This course follows the age of exploration, discovery, and colonization, with an emphasis on the development of culture, economy and politics of the English colonies of North America. It will then focus upon international rivalry on the continent and the tensions leading to the Revolution.

HIS 362     Antebellum America
Credit Hours: 3
Explores the period of American history from the Era of Good Feelings through the Mexican American War. Issues covered include nationalism, sectionalism, Jacksonian democracy, Manifest Destiny, slavery, Native Americans, reform movements and party politics.

HIS 364     Civil War and Reconstruction
Credit Hours: 3
The Civil War is the keystone in American history. This course will trace the causes of the war, its military history, and its social, political, and economic impact upon the nation during Reconstruction.

HIS 366     The U.S. in the Gilded Age and Progressive Era
Credit Hours: 3
The United States from the end of Reconstruction to the end of the Progressive Era, with discussion of the issues surrounding segregation, immigration, industrialization, foreign policy, the Spanish-American War, the rise of Progressivism, and World War I.

HIS 368     Contemporary America
Credit Hours: 3
The United States from the early days of the Cold War to the present, with consideration of 1950s culture, Kennedy, the civil rights movement, the Great Society, Vietnam, the counterculture, Watergate, the rise of the American right, and contemporary issues.

HIS 369     The Great Depression and World War II
Credit Hours: 3
The United States from 1920 to 1945, with reference to the consumer culture, interwar foreign policy, the Great Crash, Franklin Roosevelt, the New Deal, the road to war, and World War II.

HIS 370-9     Special Topics
Credit Hours: 1-3
Special topics in history depending upon demand and staff.

HIS 398    Historiography
Credit Hours: 3
An introduction to the historian’s craft, with special reference to methodologies, interpretations, values, evidence, and conclusions found in historical writings.

400 Level:  Methods, Internships and Seminars

HIS 400     Methods of Teaching History and Social Studies
Credit Hours: 3
Designed to acquaint the prospective teacher of history and social studies with the techniques, materials, resources, and problems of teaching at the secondary level. This course, intended for students in the teacher certification program, ordinarily does not apply to the history major. Prerequisite: acceptance into the teacher education program.

HIS 470-9  Special Topics
Credit Hours: 1-3
Special topics in history depending upon demand and staff.

HIS 481     Public History Internship
Credit Hours: 3
Provides an opportunity for on-the-job experience in community agencies in such fields as cultural resource management, archival work, historical preservation and interpretation. Students must be history majors with junior standing and have the approval of the agency and history faculty.

HIS 497    Seminar in History I
Credit Hours: 3
Capstone course with an in-depth study of historiography, historical method, and historical criticism.

HIS 498    Seminar in History II
Credit Hours: 3
Capstone course with an emphasis on a synthesis of historical skills as demonstrated through original primary research and presentation of findings.

PHILOSOPHY

PHI 115    Introduction to Philosophy and Ethics
Credit Hours: 3
This course is an introduction to philosophy that places an emphasis on ethics. Utilizing texts in Ancient, Modern, and Contemporary Philosophy, we will examine the interrelationships of some of the basic philosophical questions:  How should I act? What can I know? What is the nature of human existence? Contemporary ethical issues will be examined within this context.

PHI 116    Introduction to World Philosophy
Credit Hours: 3
This course will provide students with an introduction to both western and eastern philosophy. Philosophies discussed will include Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, as well as classic works in western philosophy.

PHI 239     Philosophy and Literature
Credit Hours: 3
Interdisciplinary course designed to raise traditional philosophical questions, e.g., the meaning of human existence, the interpretation of language, through reading both philosophical and literary texts.

PHI 251    History of Philosophy: Ancient-Medieval
Credit Hours: 3
Survey of the origins and historical development of Western philosophy and theology, from ancient Greece to the beginning of the modern era.

PHI 252    History of Philosophy: Modern and Contemporary
Credit Hours: 3
Survey of origins and historical development through the present.  Continuation of PHI 251.

PHI 270-9     Special Topics
Credit Hours: 1-3
Special topics in Philosophy depending upon demand and staff.

PHI 321     Ethical Theories
Credit Hours: 3
Examines traditional ethical positions and how they apply to contemporary moral debates. Prerequisite: any other philosophy course.

PHI 323     Bioethics
Credit Hours: 3
Ethical issues involved in medicine and biotechnology.

PHI 325     Environmental Ethics
Credit Hours: 3
Studies of the moral relationship of humans to the environment.

PHI 327     Business Ethics
Credit Hours: 3
Examines the conceptions of moral community and responsibility implicit in democratic capitalism.

PHI 329    Ethics and Technology
Credit Hours: 3
Examines the social and ethical aspects of emerging technologies.

PHI 331     Faith, Philosophy, and God
Credit Hours: 3
This upper-level seminar course explores the challenges philosophy has presented to Christian theology and theism more generally in the modern and contemporary period and how Christian theology and religious thought have responded to those challenges.

PHI 347    Existentialism
Credit Hours: 3
In this course students and faculty will read and discuss together various thinkers considered to be within the important and very diverse philosophical and literary tradition of existentialism. Existential philosophers and literary figures discussed may include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, deBeauvoir, and others.

PHI 351     Feminist Philosophy and Theology
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the various ways feminist theory has affected and changed both philosophy and theology in the modern and contemporary periods.  (Same as TRS 351)

PHI 355     Violence, Power, and the Philosophy of Nonviolence
Credit Hours: 3
We explore the problem of violence and power in many ways and what philosophers have had to say about the incredible violence of the 20th and 21st centuries.  This course introduces students to the philosophical/theological tradition of nonviolent resistance through a focus on such figures as Thoreau, Emerson, Gandhi, Martin Luther King, and Thomas Merton, etc.

PHI 360    Figures and Texts in Philosophy
Credit Hours: 3
The course is designed to give students and faculty the ability to study areas of philosophical interest on a rotating basis. Each offering involves the concentrated study of selected texts from a designated period (Ancient or Medieval philosophy), area of philosophy (pragmatism), or by designated authors (Plato, Kant or Hegel).

PHI 368     Holocaust as Act and Idea
Credit Hours: 3
The analysis of the rise of German nationalists and anti-Semitic ideology leading to World War II and the Holocaust: the Holocaust as a combination of violent actions and both respectable and intolerable ideas.

PHI 370-9 Special Topics
Credit Hours: 1-3
Special topics studied in depth, depending on demand and staff. Possible topics include particular positions, e.g., Existentialism, Pragmatism, etc.

PHI 381     Contemporary Philosophy & Contemporary Politics
Credit Hours: 3
Looks at various post World War II philosophers in America and Europe, paying special attention to how they have addressed the most crucial political issues of our time, including the probe of genocide, America’s two wars against Iraq, terrorism, September 11th, and globalization.

PHI 391     Aesthetics
Credit Hours: 3
A philosophical study of the nature of art and creativity through the analysis of philosophers, critics, and artists who have treated these subjects.

PHI 424    The Common Good: An Interdisciplinary Exploration
Credit Hours: 3
The tension between the individual and the group exists in every culture. This interdisciplinary course examines many of the dimensions of this tension from different perspectives (e.g. psychological, sociological, economic, political, philosophical, theological, artistic, etc.) and explores a wide range of proposals offered to enable a society to pursue the common good.

PHI 470-9  Special Topics
Credit Hours: 1-3
Specific topics studied in depth, depending on demand and staff. Focus on the works of particular philosophers, in primary sources.

PHI 497     Coordinating Seminar
Credit Hours: 3
Required of seniors in the Philosophy and Ethics concentration of the Theology and Philosophy major.

Theology

TRS 116    Western Religious Traditions
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the scriptural, doctrinal, moral, and ritual traditions of the three major Western religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Freshman and Sophomore students only.

TRS 201    Technological Resources for Students of Philosophy and Theology
Credit Hours: 1
In compliance with the University’s commitment to universal technological literacy, Philosophy and Theology majors will learn skills needed to access and incorporate philosophical and theological databases, online and offline computer programs, and educational media (Microsoft Office, et al).

TRS 217     Introduction to the Bible
Credit Hours: 3
Survey course of the Old and New Testaments. Prerequisites: ENG 111 and 112.

TRS 222    Introduction to the Franciscan Tradition
Credit Hours: 3
A survey course that explores the history, figures, literature, art and issues within the Franciscan tradition.

TRS 229    Introduction to Christian Moral Conscience
Credit Hours: 3
A basic introduction to processes of Christian ethical interpretation and moral decision making.

TRS 236     Sacraments
Credit Hours: 3
This course will examine the sacraments as concrete expressions of the grace of Christ in the church community. It will look at the scriptural and historical foundations of each of the sacraments, examine their liturgical rites, and discuss questions about their theological meaning and contemporary relevance.

TRS 246     Catholic Life and Thought
Credit Hours: 3
This course will examine the creed, sacraments, moral traditions, and prayer life of the Catholic church. Students will have the opportunity to reflect critically on these beliefs and practices within the context of their own faith perspective.

TRS 251    History of Christianity I: From Jesus to the Dawn of the Reformation
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the key themes and historical development of Christian life and thought from the first century to the dawn of the Reformation.

TRS 252    History of Christianity II: From the Reformation to the Present
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the key themes and historical development of Christian theology and culture from the Reformation to the present.

TRS 256    Introduction to Christian Theology
Credit Hours: 3
A survey of how Christians have thought about their faith over the centuries. Themes to be addressed will include Jesus Christ, the Christian God, grace and salvation, and the church, as well as the changing understanding of theology itself.

TRS 270-9  Special Topics
Credit Hours: 1-3
Special topics studied in depth, depending upon demand and staff.

TRS 319     Christian Sexuality
Credit Hours: 3
An investigation of sexuality in Christian life and tradition. Open discussion of contemporary issues in sexual ethics.

TRS 321     Theology of Church
Credit Hours: 3
A study of the meaning of today’s Church and the role of the laity in the Church. Special emphasis will be given to lay ministry in carrying on the mission of Jesus in contemporary society.

TRS 324     Religions in Dialogue
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the fragile and often volatile relationships among the world’s major religions: Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, and the indigenous religions of Africa, Australia, the Pacific Rim, and the Americas. Close consideration will be paid to the Geopolitical and cross-cultural implications of these relationships.

TRS 331     Spirituality and Human Development
Credit Hours: 3
This course considers the relationship between a person’s spiritual growth and human development as a person moves toward greater maturity.

TRS 332    Assisi Experience
Credit Hours: 3
An investigation of special topics, depending on the participating staff, culminating in a trip to Assisi, Italy, in early May. Permission of instructor(s) required.

TRS 339     Guide to Christian Marriage
Credit Hours: 3
The meaning of marriage; preparation for marriage; legal and moral aspects of the contract; rights and duties of married people.

TRS 341     Liturgy and Worship
Credit Hours: 3
A study of liturgy and worship in Christian traditions. Worship leadership roles and the role of the congregation will be considered.

TRS 342    Franciscan Theology of the Environment
Credit Hours: 3
An exploration of environmental issues from the perspective of Franciscan creation centered spirituality including the scriptural views of creation, modern environmental ethics and the theological concept of ”stewardship.“

TRS 349     Theology of Death
Credit Hours: 3
The phenomena of suffering, dying and death from the perspective of pastoral theology.

TRS 351     Feminist Philosophy & Theology
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the various ways feminist theory has affected and changed both philosophy and theology in the modern and contemporary periods. (Same as PHI 351)

TRS 352     Franciscan Servant Leadership
Credit Hours: 3
A course designed to prepare students to be sound Christian leaders in the world. The course will first focus on the writings of Robert Greenleaf, who coined the phrase “servant leadership.” It will then expand to investigate Sacred Scripture as well as Franciscan sources, showing a distinctive kind of servant leadership, Christian and Franciscan. Concepts include: leadership as service; the common good; acceptance and empathy; moral leadership; and community.

TRS 356     Christology
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the central question of Christian theology, the identity of Jesus Christ, as it is thought and rethought in many ways throughout the history of Christianity.

TRS 357     Exploring the New Testament
Credit Hours: 3
The New Testament of the Christian Bible narrates the story of Jesus and reflects on what his life, teachings, death, and resurrection tell us about God. In this course students have the opportunity to explore first-hand the New Testament, gaining a broad overview of its theology, history, and literary power. However, beyond an overview, in this course we will also seek to mine some of the deep, spiritual riches of the New Testament through a close reading of selected texts.

TRS 359     Catholic Social Teaching
Credit Hours: 3
This seminar-style course will discuss the Catholic Church’s teachings on the most significant ethical, political, and social issues of our time and their relevance not only to our own country but to the entire world. Topics may include the death penalty, economic justice, capitalism, war and peace, globalization, etc.

TRS 361    Pastoral Ministry
Credit Hours: 3
A study of pastoral care and the skills needed to become effective practitioners in such areas as campus ministry, peer ministry, ministry to the elderly and the sick, and general parish/congregational ministry. The focus is on the lay person’s role in pastoral care.

TRS 362    Franciscan Theology
Credit Hours: 3
A close study of the contributions the Franciscan thinkers (especially Bonaventure and Scotus) have made to the Christian understanding of the Trinity, Christology, Anthropology, Creation, Salvation and the Church.

TRS 367    Hebrew Prophets
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the prophets in the Hebrew scriptures, with a close study of the prophetic writings of such as Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel.

TRS 369     Christianity from a Global Perspective
Credit Hours: 3
This course will examine the challenges that the local Christian theologies of Africa, Asia, and Latin America place before Christians across the globe. Particular attention will be given to understandings of love, justice, power, and inculturation.

TRS 370-9  Special Topics
Credit Hours: 1-3
Special topics studied in depth, depending upon demand and staff.

TRS 381    Religious Education and Youth Ministry
Credit Hours: 3

This course will explore the various dimensions of religious education and youth ministry including different models for religious education (traditional classroom, whole family catechesis, etc.), the different elements involved in youth ministry (catechesis, relational youth ministry, etc.), and the various ways to recruit and train volunteers working in religious education or youth ministry. A critical component of this course will involve understanding faith development, especially in children and adolescents.

TRS 382 Franciscan Spirituality
Credit Hours: 3
An examination of the spirituality and history of the Franciscan tradition and its contemporary implications. Examination of the charism, spirit, and development of the Franciscan movement.

TRS 470-9  Special Topics
Credit Hours: 1-3
Special topics studied in depth, depending upon demand and staff.

TRS 481-482  Field Experience
Credit Hours: 6
Experiences in lay ministry contexts such as pastoral care, pastoral religious education, pastoral responsibilities, etc., in preparation for positions in church and ministry. Approximately 50 hours of experience are required for each credit hour. (Does not fulfill general education requirement)

TRS 497    Theology Capstone
Credit Hours: 3
Supervised reference and research work; coordination of studies taken in Theology. Includes a portfolio of work done in the major.

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