Psychology

Program Requirements

Psychology

  • General requirements for the baccalaureate degree.
  • PSY 100 (fulfills general education requirement in Social Sciences).
  • 36 hours of coursework in Psychology, 200-400 level.
  • Required Psychology courses: PSY 236 or 246, PSY 311, 316, 317, 326, and 490; one course selected from PSY 300, 332 or 342; PSY 497 or 498.
  • A grade of "C" or higher is required in PSY 316.
  • Required support course: SOC 227.
  • A student can receive a grade lower than "C" in no more than one of the required Psychology courses listed in #4 and may earn only one grade of "D" in any Psychology course.

General and Special Programs:

All psychology courses are taught from a traditional point of view emphasizing historical trends and the fundamentals of the science. The psychology curriculum is designed to provide a comprehensive learning experience for future graduate school admission, and psychology- related occupations.

The program provides the undergraduate preparation necessary to pursue further training in any of the thirty-plus specialties such as clinical, cognitive, comparative, consumer, counseling, developmental, environmental, evaluation and measurement, exercise and sport, health, industrial/organizational, physiological, rehabilitation, school, social, and occupational therapy.

For those students considering graduate study in Psychology, the following courses are highly recommended for preparation for the Graduate Record Examination, Advanced Test in Psychology: PSY 300, 311, 332, and 430.

Suggested courses for the tools requirement are COM 101, MIS 210, and MAT 125.

Requirements for a Minor:
For a minor in Psychology a student must complete 21 hours in Psychology, including PSY 100 and two courses selected from PSY 227, 236, 246, 300, 311, 316, 317, 326, 332, or 490. An additional 12 hours in Psychology are required.

Special Program:
Membership in the National Psychology Honor Society, Chi, is available to students who meet the criteria for membership.

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